Posts tagged rick perry.

Rick Perry's Hunting Ranch was Named Niggerhead ›

nom-chompsky:

liquornspice:

karnythia:

lemuffinmistress:

When I heard about this, I legitimately thought that it was an off-color Onion article. 

This is scary as shit. 

A hunting ranch

Named Niggerhead

Names like Niggerhead were incredibly common. America’s anti-black bias is sewn so deep into the fabric of this country I sometimes think it can never be erased. 

::blink::

The fancy rich people golf course in Indianapolis was called Hanging Tree until they finally changed it in 2005ish. Not as blatant as Perry’s hunting club, but yeah…

(via paxamericana)

The crucial Perry-Romney exchange on Social Security at last night's Tea Party Debate

  • ROMNEY: "But the real question is does Governor Perry continue to believe that Social Security should not be a federal program, that it's unconstitutional and it should be returned to the states or is he going to retreat from that view?"
  • CNN'S WOLF BLITZER: "Let's let Governor Perry respond. You have 30 seconds."
  • PERRY: "If what you're trying to say is that back in the '30s and the '40s that the federal government made all the right decision, I disagree with you. And it's time for us to get back to the constitution and a program that's been there 70 or 80 years, obviously we're not going to take that program away. But for people to stand up and support what they did in the '30s or what they're doing in the 2010s is not appropriate for America."
  • ROMNEY: "But the question is, do you still believe that Social Security should be ended as a federal program as you did six months ago when your book came out and returned to the states or do you want to retreat from that?"
  • PERRY: "I think we ought to have a conversation."
  • ROMNEY: "We're having that right now, governor. We're running for president."
  • PERRY: "And I'll finish this conversation. But the issue is, are there ways to move the states into Social Security for state employees or for retirees? We did in the state of Texas back in the 1980s. I think those types of thoughtful conversations with America, rather than trying to scare seniors like you're doing and other people, it's time to have a legitimate conversation in this country about how to fix that program where it's not bankrupt and our children actually know that there's going to be a retirement program there for them."
  • ROMNEY: "Governor, the term ponzi scheme is what scared seniors, number one. And number two, suggesting that Social Security should no longer be a federal program and returned to the states and unconstitutional is likewise frightening."
  • Intriguing.

Poor Richard's News: The Big 4: the GOP candidates and their weaknesses ›

poorrichardsnews:

As I watched the CNN/Tea Party debate last night, I couldn’t help but notice that much of the evening was devoted to prodding all of Governor Rick Perry’s weaknesses. This isn’t unfair because, Perry is the current frontrunner and needs to have his weak points out in the open. We all know what…

(via amodernmanifesto)

The Perry philosophy

zainyk:

Get federal government out of our business and get business into our federal government.

(via sarahlee310)

jvbrewer:

Perry on immigration: We need boots on the ground and Predator drones to secure the border with Mexico.

timetruthhumor:

Republican candidates turn attacks on each other

Gov. Rick Perry is privately being coached to come across as more presidential — cautious in his comments, deliberate in defending his Texas record — while building on his fast start by trying to consolidate support across the Republican spectrum, from the Tea Party and evangelicals to the party establishment.

Former Gov. Mitt Romney of Massachusetts is steeling for a long and combative fight for the Republican nomination, dropping his front-runner’s strategy and preparing to confront Mr. Perry on immigration, his quarter-century in government and his claims of creating jobs in Texas.

Representative Michele Bachmann of Minnesota is working to shatter the notion that the race is becoming a two-person contest, scaling back her campaign appearances to study Mr. Perry’s spending record in Texas in an effort to raise skepticism about his candidacy among Tea Party supporters. […]

(via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

Is Barack Obama responsible for our current economic problems? ›

Is Barack Obama responsible for our current economic problems? Should Gov. Rick Perry of Texas get credit for his state’s relative prosperity through the Great Recession? Investor’s Business Daily thinks the answers are clear: “By almost every measure, Texas has done far better over the past two and a half years under Perry’s stewardship than the nation as a whole has done under Obama’s.” Specifically, says I.B.D., since Obama’s term begin in 2009, Texas has surpassed the United States as a whole in adding jobs, lowering unemployment and increasing economic growth and wages.

If we really want to look at it, There’s one constant -  George W. Bush.  He essentially put in place the mechanisms that would lead to a boom for the Texas state economy (having served as Governor from 1995-2000), then destroyed the national economy by boosting and supporting the two leading economies of the state, energy and defense (high oil prices/conflict).

timetruthhumor:

Rick Perry: Making George W. Bush seem sensible.

(via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

Huntsman on the Hunt…

leftish:

Hatched from out of Bush’s Brain??  Oh, dear…

Palestinian refugees flee Latakia, Syria during a four-day assault by government forces; France and Germany hold economic talks; and President Obama and Gov. Rick Perry of Texas campaign in Iowa.

Rick Perry's Crony Capitalism Problem ›

evilteabagger:

…One of the governor’s signature economic development initiatives—the Texas Emerging Technology Fund—has lately raised serious questions among some conservatives.

The Emerging Technology Fund was created at Mr. Perry’s behest in 2005 to act as a kind of public-sector venture capital firm, largely to provide funding for tech start-ups in Texas. Since then, the fund has committed nearly $200 million of taxpayer money to fund 133 companies. Mr. Perry told a group of CEOs in May that the fund’s “strategic investments are what’s helping us keep groundbreaking innovations in the state.” The governor, together with the lieutenant governor and the speaker of the Texas House, enjoys ultimate decision-making power over the fund’s investments.

Among the companies that the Emerging Technology Fund has invested in is Convergen LifeSciences, Inc. It received a $4.5 million grant last year—the second largest grant in the history of the fund. The founder and executive chairman of Convergen is David G. Nance.

In 2009, when Mr. Nance submitted his application for a $4.5 million Emerging Technology Fund grant for Convergen, he and his partners had invested only $1,000 of their own money into their new company, according to documentation prepared by the governor’s office in February 2010. But over the years, Mr. Nance managed to invest a lot more than $1,000 in Mr. Perry. Texas Ethics Commission records show that Mr. Nance donated $75,000 to Mr. Perry’s campaigns between 2001 and 2006.

The regional panel that reviewed Convergen’s application turned down the company’s $4.5 million request when it presented its proposal on Oct. 7, 2009. But Mr. Nance appealed that decision directly to a statewide advisory committee (of which Mr. Nance was once a member) appointed by Mr. Perry. Just eight days later, on Oct. 15, a subcommittee unanimously recommended approval by the full statewide committee. On Oct. 29, the full advisory committee unanimously recommended the approval of Convergen’s application. When asked why the advisory committee felt comfortable recommending Convergen’s grant, Lucy Nashed, a spokesperson for Mr. Perry, said that the committee “thoroughly vetted the company.”

Starting in 2008, Mr. Perry also appropriated approximately $2 million in federal taxpayer money through the auspices of the Wagner-Peyser Act—a federal works program founded during the New Deal and overseen in Texas by Mr. Perry’s office—to a nonprofit launched by Mr. Nance called Innovate Texas. The nonprofit was meant to help entrepreneurs by linking them to investors. It began receiving funding on Dec. 31, 2008, soon after Mr. Nance’s previous company, Introgen Therapeutics, declared bankruptcy on Dec. 3. According to state records, Mr. Nance paid himself $250,000 for the two years he ran Innovate Texas. Innovate Texas, whose listed phone number is not a working number, could not be reached for comment. (Two phone calls left for Mr. Nance at Convergen’s offices went unreturned.)

ThromboVision, Inc., a medical imaging company, was also the recipient of an award from the Emerging Technology Fund: It received $1.5 million in 2007. Charles Tate, a major Perry contributor, served as the chairman of a state committee that reviewed ThromboVision’s application for state funding, and Mr. Tate voted to give ThromboVision the public money. One month after ThromboVision received notification that it would receive a $1.5 million state grant in April 2007, Mr. Tate invested his own money in ThromboVision, according to the Dallas Morning News. The Texas paper later found that by 2010 Mr. Tate owned a total of 200,000 preferred shares in ThromboVision.

Rick Perry's Army of God - The Texas Observer ›

Just in time for Gov. Perry to enter the race….

robot-heart-politics:

On September 28, 2009, at 1:40 p.m., God’s messengers visited Rick Perry.

On this day, the Lord’s messengers arrived in the form of two Texas pastors, Tom Schlueter of Arlington and Bob Long of San Marcos, who called on Perry in the governor’s office inside the state Capitol. Schlueter and Long both oversee small congregations, but they are more than just pastors. They consider themselves modern-day apostles and prophets, blessed with the same gifts as Old Testament prophets or New Testament apostles.

The pastors told Perry of God’s grand plan for Texas. A chain of powerful prophecies had proclaimed that Texas was “The Prophet State,” anointed by God to lead the United States into revival and Godly government. And the governor would have a special role.

The day before the meeting, Schlueter had received a prophetic message from Chuck Pierce, an influential prophet from Denton, Texas. God had apparently commanded Schlueter—through Pierce—to “pray by lifting the hand of the one I show you that is in the place of civil rule.”

Gov. Perry, it seemed.

Schlueter had prayed before his congregation: “Lord Jesus I bring to you today Gov. Perry. … I am just bringing you his hand and I pray Lord that he will grasp ahold of it. For if he does you will use him mightily.”

And grasp ahold the governor did. At the end of their meeting, Perry asked the two pastors to pray over him. As the pastors would later recount, the Lord spoke prophetically as Schlueter laid his hands on Perry, their heads bowed before a painting of the Battle of the Alamo. Schlueter “declared over [Perry] that there was a leadership role beyond Texas and that Texas had a role beyond what people understand,” Long later told his congregation.

[…]

The movement’s top prophets and apostles believe they have a direct line to God. Through them, they say, He communicates specific instructions and warnings. When mankind fails to heed the prophecies, the results can be catastrophic: earthquakes in Japan, terrorist attacks in New York, and economic collapse. On the other hand, they believe their God-given decrees have ended mad cow disease in Germany and produced rain in drought-stricken Texas.

Their beliefs can tend toward the bizarre. Some consider Freemasonry a “demonic stronghold” tantamount to witchcraft. The Democratic Party, one prominent member believes, is controlled by Jezebel and three lesser demons. Some prophets even claim to have seen demons at public meetings. They’ve taken biblical literalism to an extreme. In Texas, they engage in elaborate ceremonies involving branding irons, plumb lines and stakes inscribed with biblical passages driven into the earth of every Texas county.

If they simply professed unusual beliefs, movement leaders wouldn’t be remarkable. But what makes the New Apostolic Reformation movement so potent is its growing fascination with infiltrating politics and government. The new prophets and apostles believe Christians—certain Christians—are destined to not just take “dominion” over government, but stealthily climb to the commanding heights of what they term the “Seven Mountains” of society, including the media and the arts and entertainment world. They believe they’re intended to lord over it all. As a first step, they’re leading an “army of God” to commandeer civilian government.

In Rick Perry, they may have found their vessel. And the interest appears to be mutual.

It sounds like The Onion, but it’s not. It’s really, really not.